Less Red Tape For Tradies In NSW And Queensland

Business

Northern Tablelands MP Adam Marshall revealed a new cross-border agreement proposal between the governments of NSW and Queensland, which might interest many a Brisbane plumber and other tradies in the two states. This new proposal will allow tradies and small businesses in NSW and Queensland to work across state regions without needing multiple licenses, which will lessen the fees and the red tape they have to deal with.

Mr. Marshall said that small businesses and tradies would be able to save hundreds of dollars annually under the proposal, submitted by the NSW Government, which will allow licence holders to operate across state lines.

The deal was struck between the two governments and associated agencies allows for a new Automatic Mutual Recognition (AMR) program, which will apply to architects, drainers, gasfitters and plumbers, good news for any Sydney or Brisbane plumber who’s looking to migrate to the borders.

Mr. Marshall says that the AMR program will allow operators to work in any state or territory across the country, which will allow them to give consumers more options. He says the issue that many northern and north western businesses have with operating across the borders is the number of border communities located across the Northern Tablelands, which means that the AMR program is a good first step on cutting down on hassle, which, he says is part of the NSW Government’s commitment to cut down on red tape for small businesses, as well as give consumers the best options.

Marshall says that the multiple licenses and inconsistencies across government services, policies and laws had a detrimental impact on businesses. For example, refrigeration and air-conditioning businesses operating across the border with Queensland that need a total of four licenses to operate (one in the Commonwealth, one in NSW, and two in Queensland) which can be problematic given that the current application fee for a trade or specialist contractor in NSW sat at $312 for a one-year licence.

He says that tradies and professionals working across the northern areas will get the most out of the AMR program, where licence requirements can be restrictive for both businesses and consumers.