ICWA Offering Research Grants To Help Improve The State Of WA’s Injured

Corporate

The Insurance Commission of Western Australia, aware of how difficult and costly it can be to get  physio in Kellyville and in other places in the AU, has recently announced an 18-month programme aimed at improving the well-being and independence of people that have received serious injuries in accidents, as well as to keep insurance premiums affordable.

Obviously, it won’t cover physio in Kellyville, but the ICWA will be making research grants of up to $200,000 available for the physiotherapy and occupational therapy researchers across WA, in order to study ways to improve the lives of the seriously injured in WA.

The Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA), Occupational Therapy Australia, alongside their respective research foundations, will be working together in order to properly coordinate the programme and make sure everything runs properly.

Treasurer Ben Wyatt stated that they approve of the Insurance Commission’s efforts to fund allied health research aimed at helping people recover from injuries they sustained from accidents or from work. Back in 2018, he reports, the Insurance Commission paid a total of $550 million in claims payments to the injured in WA, so funding research to improve physiotherapy methods is both a moral and pragmatic decision; in that in helps the wellbeing of their clientele, as well as cutting down on the costs they have to face in paying claims to injured people.

APA National President Phil Calvert considers it a good example of a government-owned insurer backing a programme that really helps the seriously injured, as well as survivors of accidents; the people who need physiotherapy. Physiotherapists study complex injury rehabilitation, in order to help their clients reintegrate back into work and their normal routines. Funding research that helps that, he says, will go a long way in improving the lives of many of WA’s injured.

In 2018, ICWA paid for about 100,000 sessions with their associated health professionals, in order to help their claimants recover from injuries suffered faster and more efficiently, which, in turn, resulted in a reduction in the cost of claims, as well as the premiums that motorists and employers have to pay for.